Cosmic

Praise

With echoes of Roald Dahl, the novel ends with an elegant punch line, and a touching endorsement of filial love.”

New York Times Book Review

  • About
  • Author
  • Reviews
  • Learn

Cosmic
by Frank Cottrell Boyce

Liam has always felt a bit like he’s stuck between two worlds. This is primarily due to the fact that he’s a twelve-year-old kid who looks like he’s about thirty. Sometimes it’s not so bad, like when his new principal mistakes him for a teacher on the first day of school, or when he convinces a car dealer to let him take a Porsche out on a test drive. But mostly it’s just frustrating, being a kid trapped in an adult world.

And so he decides to flip things around.

Liam cons his way onto the first spaceship to take civilians into space, a special flight for a group of kids and an adult chaperone, and he is going as the adult chaperone. It’s not long before Liam, along with his friends, is stuck between two worlds again – only this time he’s 239,000 miles from home.

About the Author: Frank Cottrell Boyce

Photo of Author Frank Cottrell Boyce

Author Frank Cottrell Boyce

Frank Cottrell Boyce is the author of two other books for children: Framed and Millions, which was made into a movie by Oscar® winning director Danny Boyle. Frank lives in England with his family

Praise & Reviews

With echoes of Roald Dahl, the novel ends with an elegant punch line, and a touching endorsement of filial love.

New York Times Book Review

In his latest extravagantly imaginative and marvelously good-natured novel, Frank Cottrell Boyce has written one that is bound to win readers’ hearts.

ALA Booklist (starred review)

A hilarious and heartfelt examination of ‘dadliness’ in all its forms. A can’t-miss offering from an author whose latest novel may be his best yet.

Publishers Weekly (starred review)

Frank Cottrell Boyce has created a riveting, affecting, sometimes snortingly funny ‘what-if’ scenario. A high-levity zero-gravity romp.

Kirkus Reviews (starred review)

A fantastic, funny, and moving novel. Celebrates not only the spirit of exploration but the human connectedness that allows it to flower.

Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books (starred review)

In Cosmic, Liam has always felt a bit like he’s stuck between two worlds. This is primarily due to the fact that he’s a twelve-year-old kid who looks like he’s about thirty. Sometimes it’s not so bad, like when his new principal mistakes him for a teacher on the first day of school. But mostly it’s just frustrating, being a kid trapped in an adult world. And so he decides to flip things around.

Liam cons his way onto the first spaceship to take civilians into space, a special flight for a group of kids and an adult chaperone, and he is going as the adult chaperone. It’s not long before Liam, along with his friends, is stuck between two worlds again – only this time he’s 239,000 miles from home.

  • Cosmic Reading Group Guide - In partnership with the National Fatherhood Initiative, this reading guide highlights the central themes of Cosmic, with special questions designed just for fathers and their children.
  • Cosmic Educator’s Guide - 4 Standards-based lesson plans that incorporate the key themes of Cosmic: Human Spaceflight, “Space Suits Aren’t Clothes, Idiot. They’re Equipment”, Science Fiction and Science Fact and The “Vomit Comet”

© 2012 Walden Media, LLC and its related entities. All rights reserved.